Category Archives: Healthy Eating

Escarole Recipes

Escarole is a winter green in the lettuce family and a close relative to endive and radicchio. Its leave are curly, slightly bitter and “meatier” than ordinary lettuce leaves.

It can be eaten raw as a part of a green salad or chopped into soups and stews.

Here are some sample recipes:

1. Straciatella with Escarole

2. Grilled Escarole with Fines Herbes Salsa Verde

3. White Bean and Escarole Soup – So many different variations of this well-known classic. This version starts with dried white beans. To save time you can also use canned.

Introducing Beanstalk Seeds

Are you looking for a fun way to get your kids outside? Do you want to engage them with nature? Teach them how to love fresh vegetables?

Beanstalk Seeds is a new seed company specializing in seeds for children’s gardening!

With exciting seeds, including those in our Plant a Rainbow kit, and resources such as our Garden Guidesheets, Beanstalk Seeds makes it easy and fun for you to engage your kids in the growing process.

What Are Beanstalk Seeds?
Previously only available at our office in KC, Kansas City Community Gardens’ specialty seeds are now available to families, youth groups and schools throughout the country at www.beanstalkseeds.com.

Skinny Plants

Why plants are so skinny

Please share.

Purple Cauliflower

purple cauliflower

Ever hear the dictum, Eat Your Colors? The reasoning is that colorful fruits and vegetables contain various nutrients that are vital for good health.

According to Wellness Today:
Green foods contain chlorophyll;
Yellow foods are rich in Vitamin C;
Orange foods are high in beta-carotene;
Red foods are rich in the phytonutrients lycopene and anthocyanin; and
Purple foods contain the most antioxidants of all the colors.

Cauliflower is a cool weather crop in the Brassica family. Cauliflower can be white, green, orange or purple.

The great thing about purple cauliflower is that it retains its color even when cooked.

I see a colorful stir-fry in your future!

Why Should I Grow My Lunch?

By Ben Eichorn of GrowYourLunch.com (Reprinted with permission)

School lunch continues to be a hot topic these days. At the end of September, The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 was up for re-authorization and voting was postponed until December 2015. For now, the 5-year-old standards for increasing fruit, vegetable and whole grain consumption and reducing salt in public school cafeterias remain in place, though on shaky footing.

The primary question at the heart of the debate around re-authorizing the Act is not about whether the food is good for our children, but rather, “Do kids actually eat the healthier food if it’s provided to them.” And the answer is yes and no – both sides of the debate can provide evidence to support their claims.

Plant Part Tacos

At Grow Your Lunch, we are heartened by the significant strides being made toward increasing the availability of healthy food in schools (see National Farm to School Network, Chef Ann Foundation and Center for Ecoliteracy, among many organizations doing great work in this area) but we remain troubled by the barriers to consumption due to our local youths’ lack of familiarity with fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Cauliflower Crust Pizza

Turkey Sausage Pizza with Cauliflower Crust
Imagine picking a cauliflower from your garden and making a pizza from it. A cauliflower crust pizza has no flour and hence no gluten. Who doesn’t like pizza? Everyone likes pizza. Kids will be lining up to sample it.

Intrigued? I surely was, couldn’t wait to try it. You can even fold it like a pizza slice.

The directions are in this recipe courtesy of the Lucky Penny Blog.

Cauliflower Crust

 

Dear Tomato: An International Crop of Food and Agriculture Poems

Dear Tomato Book Cover

Bursting with flavor and just the right infusion of insight, Dear Tomato: An International Crop of Food and Agriculture Poems presents a collection of poems from thirty-four writers on the most universal topic of all: food. Featuring a wide assortment of styles, from haiku to acrostics to free verse, these poems touch on topics that range from lighthearted to seriously thought-provoking. Whether the focus of the poem is a child’s battle over eating peas or a celebration of fair trade, this collection introduces kids to a fresh new view of where their food comes from.

They’ll love following along as they track what they eat—from a tiny seed all the way to the fork that brings it to their mouth! Throughout the anthology, each entry’s words and ideas are brought to life by Norie Wasserman’s stunning black-and-white photographs, which themselves are poetry for the eyes. A fun and enlightening read for kids eight to twelve years of age, this collection will add to your family’s dinnertime conversation, while also providing an excellent resource for teachers and librarians.