Category Archives: School Garden News

Pre-K Garden’s Bounty

By Elvia J. Montanez, Director or the Pre-K program,
Holy Name of Mary School, San Dimas, CA

We’re just a single pre-k class in a pre-k through eighth grade school, but the children and parents have helped create a beautiful and bountiful garden.  It is actually the space of dirt found in a “U-shape” between parking spaces in our parish parking lot.  This space is right outside our classroom door, which is convenient.  A former class parent helped remove dried bushes from the area in the summer months before the school year started, and a work weekend (which ended up being rainy, but we trudged on) with a few families prepared the soil.

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It’s not a large space at all, but our tiny garden has produced enough food and enjoyment to help feed various snack times for our four and five year old students, salads and vegetable trays were made on various occasions for the school and the parish staff, veggies went home (one gallon bag of lettuce per family/20 families and various other veggies at different times), families often picked lettuce or herbs to use at home, and at various times throughout the school year we sent carrots and lettuce (about 5 gallon zip bags each time) to our local homeless shelters during our school’s monthly collection of lunches (the Double Bag Lunch program) for the homeless in our area.  The children learned how to dry dill and hand made spice packets to take home their dried herbs.

This year we have grown dill, cilantro, lettuce, spinach, and carrots in the fall and winter.  We are currently caring for our spring and summer garden of squash, tomatoes, and cucumbers which were grown from seed.  Early on we planted wildflowers (also from seeds) because one of our students had hoped pre-k would be a place where she could pick flowers (and she did…almost daily).

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The children learned about farming and gardening from a “hand to mouth” experience.  At the beginning of the school year we took a field trip to California State Polytechnic University, Pomona’s pumpkin patch and farm store.  There the children harvested pumpkins, shopped the farm store to pick out fruits and vegetables for the week, and watched day laborers plant a field of strawberries.  The week after, the children planted their winter garden from seed.  They cared for it and eventually harvested the bounty for snacks which they prepared and washed themselves.  In the early stages of the garden we were blessed with a finding of ladybug larva on a nearby tree.  The larva was collected, observed and eventually the lady bugs were released into the garden.  Over the winter months they seemed to multiply, giving the children a lesson on sustaining healthy plants without aphids and great joy in catching and releasing them.

Recently, the children learned how to collect seeds from their plants which will be used for next year’s garden.

Probably one of the most memorable moments in gardening was watching a young student who wouldn’t touch fruits or vegetables at the start of the school year, end up being one of the students who takes the most enjoyment from gardening and harvesting its fruits and vegetables.  She still won’t eat them, but doesn’t complain when placed in front of her at snack time and loves preparing the snacks for others to eat.

Our garden has been used in math centers, science centers, and even art centers (we took the brown, wilted leaves of the lettuce and painted with them).  We have several families who have started their own gardens at home as a result of the impact the school garden has had on their children.  It has been an awesome experience!

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School Gardens in the News

1) Riverside, CA
Banning children learn how does a garden grow

Third- and fourth-grade students at Hemmerling Elementary School in Banning are tending to a vegetable garden on campus, where they’re growing zucchini, tomatoes, radishes, cilantro and string beans.
“It’s just fun that you get to grow your own plants,” said Nick Barnes, 10.

2) Ontario, Canada
Butterfly project takes wing

After growing from their eggs and munching leaves to grow strong, 20 black and yellow caterpillars each spun a chrysalis and emerged, much to the delight of many Monsignor O’Donoghue pupils, as painted lady butterflies.

3) Sioux City, IA
Students turning park into butterfly garden

Back in October, East Middle School students joined a club called “We Can Change the World Challenge”.  The students met twice a week after school planning to make-over a green space in Sioux City.

4) Wenatchee, WA
School garden brings nourishment to cafeteria and classroom

Anaka Mines held up a clump of grass attached to a maze of long, white roots, and Liberty Bell High School eighth-graders recognized it immediately as a rhizome. An hour later, first- and second-graders from Methow Valley Elementary School needed a little coaxing. “It rhymes with,” Lexi Koch offered, chuckling as she struggled to come up a word, “pie-zomes.”

5) Eugene, OR
How do their gardens grow? With agriculture experts, enthusiastic students and volunteers all in a row

The term “school grounds” used to mean swings, slides and teeter totters. These days, at about 30 schools in the Eugene-Springfield area, it also means lettuce, peas, squash, tomatoes — even garlic.

6) Santa Cruz, CA
Life Lab Science Program Celebrates 30 Years with Garden Festival

For 30 years, Life Lab Science Program has been helping educators and students bring learning to life in the garden. Based in Santa Cruz, Life Lab has been a leader in the garden-based learning movement locally and across the nation.

7) Cardiff, CA
Students sell produce to local restaurant

Children at Cardiff Elementary School have spent the last several months growing produce that will be used this weekend in salads at a nearby restaurant. On Friday morning, a group of roughly 40 students excitedly walked a couple of baskets and buckets full of lettuce, carrots, parsley and edible flowers to the nearby Rimel’s Rotisserie restaurant and got a cool $200 for their work.

School Gardens in the News

1)Spring Hill, FL
Kids learn hydroponic gardening

Linda Rothenberg’s students have turned more than $5,000 in grants into an outdoor classroom that is growing vegetables. As Westside Elementary School’s science lab teacher, Rothenberg sees more than 700 students in kindergarten through fifth grade, and all have participated in the project.

2) New York, NY
PS 6 breaks ground on NYC public schools’ first green roof, a dream of teacher who passed in ’07

A public school in New York City has broken ground for a rooftop garden and greenhouse. The roof will have planting soil for vegetables and flowers, solar panels, a weather station, a turtle pond and a greenhouse for classes during the winter.

3) St Thomas, USVI
At Sibilly, Composting Starts From The Ground Up

Jason Budsan of EAST talked to the Sibilly School Gardening Club members after the ceremony. “Compost is nature’s first recycling project. It starts from the ground up,” he said. He showed them three flower pots filled with different kinds of things that will become compost — papers, grass and leave clippings and kitchen trimmings.  He explained how the compost bin works. “Collect organic waste materials, and put them in the tumbler. Add enough water to moisten only. Close the door and give the bin five turns every few days. In about four to six weeks, you will have supercharged soil.

4) San Jose, CA
Parents help San Jose school garden programs grow

The Booksin school foundation and parent volunteers are working on a grass roots pilot program to turn the campus garden at 1590 Dry Creek Road into a training center for teachers from other schools in the San Jose Unified School District. Teachers would use the Booksin garden to learn how to conduct classroom activities, and then bring that knowledge back to their students, says parent Jennifer Mowery.

5) Pocantico Hills, NY
School of gardening: Stone Barns is teaching teachers how to grow vegetables and integrate that into the classroom curriculum.

Long before the popularity of buzzwords like “sustainability,” “locally grown” and “organic,” Denise Martabano was planting her first school garden with youngsters from the Meadow Pond Elementary School in South Salem…And now this local pioneer in the school-gardening movement is spending many of her Saturdays at the Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture in Pocantico Hills leading workshops with teachers from throughout the tri-state region, teaching them how to grow gardens at their own schools and integrate them into the classroom curriculum.

6) Portsmouth, England, UK
Sounds like this school garden is extra special

The garden is alive with the sound of music thanks to new oversized instruments at a school…The seven beautifully hand-crafted outdoor musical instruments which range from eye chimes, to drums, xylophones and chime bars, have been carefully selected for younger children.

Got Dirt? Celebs to Adopt Organic Gardens in LAUSD Schools

From LAist.com

This week, the Environmental Media Association’s Young Hollywood Board is putting on the gloves and digging deep in support of organic gardening in Los Angeles-area schools. Celebs on the Board, including Nicole Richie, Lance Bass, Rosario Dawson, members of Maroon 5, Amy Smart, Matthew Rhys, Emily VanCamp and Emmanuelle Chriqui, will each adopt an area school, help with the planting, and check in with their gardens during the school year, explains People.

The project is the product of a newly-formed partnership between the EMA and the Los Angeles Unified School District’s School Gardens program, and personal care brand Yes To Inc. The launch event is scheduled for tomorrow morning at Hollywood’s Helen Bernstein High School, and the program will take root over the next several months.

Just how much dirt Richie et al will actually get under their fingernails remains to be seen, but Bass for one is pretty stoked: “Organic gardens are so important, especially in urban areas where many students would otherwise never see any greenery. I hope that the support will help them to grow and flourish in Los Angeles.”

School Gardens in the News

1) Cookeville, TN
Butterfly garden opens at Park View, provides unique educational experience

A horticultural dream came true in recent weeks for one Park View Elementary teacher. Kindergarten teacher Beverly Hall is a Putnam County Master Gardener and appreciates the physical, emotional and mental value of working in the outdoors, so she envisioned what is now the butterfly garden in the back corner of the Park View playground, hoping it will aid in students’ well-being.

2) Medham, NJ
Mendham High School growing own vegetables

West Morris Mendham High School students will plant warm-weather crops on Tuesday at the school’s first outdoor classroom – a 24-foot by 26-foot vegetable garden located on school property. The vegetables will be used by the students in the culinary arts classes.

3) Flint, MI
Students turn school space into garden of plenty

The project is funded by a $500 grant from Keep Genesee County Beautiful. Students also sold flower bulbs to help offset expenses.

4) Portland, OR
Hazelbrook students garden for those in need

The seventh graders at Hazelbrook Middle School hope their garden outside Eileen MacPherson’s classroom will help the local food pantry meet its increased demand for food – and balance out the bread, rice and pasta on its shelves.

5) Beverly, MA
After-school club plants their veggies — and they’ll eat them, too

Anyone who thinks children don’t like vegetables never met the kids in the Beverly Bootstraps after-school program.

6) Wooster, OH
IB students plan to donate produce harvested from garden

It can’t hurt to take time out from a demanding academic schedule for a hands-on activity in an outdoor setting. In fact, international baccalaureate students studying at Wooster High School anticipate their garden in the school’s backyard will help. Their goal is to offer community service — a component of their degree program — through donating the produce they harvest.

7) Kalaheo, HI
Students’ harvest plants seeds for the future

Money is a great motivator for kids, said Kalaheo School third grade teacher Clyde Hashimoto. “When they see money, they get interested,” Hashimoto said in an invitation to watch the Kalaheo School third grade students harvest vegetables.

School Gardens in the News

1) Sonoma, CA
School gardens flourishing in the valley
Experts preach the benefits of fresh air, sunshine and exercise as part of every child’s daily life. In Sonoma, schools have picked up on the research, even carrying it into the curriculum by making time for outdoor activities. One of the best ways to accomplish this – gardening.

2) Rogers, AR
Children’s Garden goes green at Jones Elementary School
A unique group of volunteers joined forces to lay the groundwork for a Children’s Garden at Russell D. Jones Elementary School.

3) Cambridge, MA
Every day is Earth Day in the school garden
CitySprouts school garden program has helped kids plant seeds and harvest vegetables all over the city for the past nine years. Each year, as CitySprouts has forged partnerships with additional schools, more and more of the city’s children are learning about food- and sharing what they know.

4) Cazenovia, WI
Students Growing Produce for School Lunch Room
A local school district is teaming-up with the community to help kids, teachers and parents go green year round by growing fresh produce.

5) Asheville, NC
Growing little gardeners
If they grow it, they will eat it. That’s the unfailing testimony from farmers and gardeners who’ve witnessed the remarkable phenomenon of a child lighting up with joy as he bites into a head of broccoli or giggling at the feel of bright red beet juice running down her chin.

6) Queen Creek, AZ
Grants given to schools to help kids eat healthy
The district’s nutrition director, Michelle Swendseid, said the inspiration for this garden actually stemmed from a special fresh fruit and vegetable program run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Swendseid said kids and teachers enjoyed the greens and fruits so much they took the idea to new heights and decided to try growing food in the school yard.

7) London, England, UK
Digging for victory: Schools back gardens plan
Today, The Independent on Sunday, working with the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS), launches a campaign to Let Children Grow. The campaign aims to get all primary schools in the UK to provide some form of practical gardening for pupils.

8) Escondido, CA
Teacher, students create native-plant garden at their school
San Marcos Middle School now has a native-plant garden that will provide ongoing lessons in water-wise landscaping, thanks to the efforts of a teacher and some of his students.

School Gardens in the News

1) San Diego, CA
Organic garden offers a hands-on experience

Walk up the steps from parking lot H at the corner of 14th and C streets to San Diego City College and you’ll find an organic farm nestled between the campus Learning Resource Center and the Saville Theatre. The water-guzzling lawn that once covered a vast expanse of the college’s landscape is now occupied by a lush garden featuring a variety of organically grown plants, fruit trees and vegetables such as chicory greens, Swiss chard, ruby mustards and bok choy.

2) Sioux Falls, SD
Students plant community garden

You could hear the drums from three blocks away.
The Lincoln Drumline, Lowell Elementary students, teachers and others gathered on the school playground celebrating the kick-off of the new community garden, officially named “A Growing Place.”
The initiative is a partnership between the Sioux Falls School District, the Sioux Falls Seminary, Minnehaha Extension Service and others to foster community spirit in Pettigrew Heights. The goal is to empower families to nurture their community, organizers say.

3) Maui, HI
An Edible Education

In an effort to plant the seeds of sustainability and conservation, South Maui Sustainability (SMS) volunteers helped students at Kīhei Elementary School fund, design, build and maintain edible gardens right on campus. And while these island youth learned the benefits of community gardening, they also enjoyed a fun, educational—and tasty— experience.

4) United Kingdom
Young people’s garden designs brought to life by Bramall Construction

Ten-year-old Megan Morris has ‘got the picture’ on the way her school’s garden should look…
So much so that the youngster’s drawings of the garden at Thorne Brooke Primary, Thorne, have been turned into reality by workmen at Bramall Construction.

5) Birmingham, AL
Birmingham Botanical Gardens program helps disabled Alabamians through horticulture therapy

Wander across the rear garden at Hewitt-Trussville High School, and you might wonder why it looks a bit different than most.
The garden’s three beds are raised, significantly. There are benches, affixed to one side of each bed’s four wooden sides, and the spaces between each bed are considerable.

6) Raceland, LA
Grant helps Raceland students grow garden

There are rose gardens and herb gardens, but what grows in an “incentive garden?”
At the moment, the small fenced-in garden at the Lafourche Parish School Board’s Positive Action School Site in Raceland lies fallow.
But thanks to a $500 national grant won for the school by the Lafourche Farm Bureau, students who stay focused and out of trouble at the school for expelled or suspended students will get the benefit of sunshine and watching vegetables grow under their care.

7) Washington, DC
The First Garden Gets Its First Planting

The international press may have been exclusively interested in what Michelle Obama was wearing on her first trip abroad last week. But the first lady said that the world leaders she met were curious about something else entirely: “The number one question I got as the first lady from world leaders — they were excited about this garden,” she told a group of students who had come to help seed the new 1,100 square foot plot on the South Lawn. “Every single person from Prince Charles on down, they were excited we were planting this garden.”