“GROW TOGETHER” WITH ONE SEED CHICAGO IN THE YEAR OF THE HERBS.

Kids in Hoophouse

The following is a guest post from OneSeedChicago.com. If you are a Chicago gardener please vote, everyone else, take notes, perhaps you’ll be inspired to start a similar program in your city.

NeighborSpace’s One Seed Chicago project lets Chicago gardeners vote on their favorite seed then distributes the winning seed for free to encourage urban farming, healthy eating habits, and sitting down for meals with family and friends.

CHICAGO – Gardeners across Chicago started the New Year by voting for their favorite herb seed for One Seed Chicago and the winning seed will be mailed to them for free. This year’s candidates are basil, chamomile, and cilantro. As in previous years, One Seed Chicago will teach Chicagoans how to grow the winning seed in their garden. Local chefs and foodies are encouraged to submit original recipes for the community featuring any of this year’s candidates to demonstrate how easy it is to go from garden to plate.

“For the fifth year One Seed Chicago is uniting Chicago gardeners,” said Ben Helphand, NeighborSpace Executive Director. “By planting a common seed, backyards, windowsills, community gardens and balconies across the City will be linked together in a season-long celebration of urban gardening and local eating.”

The three candidates were selected at the annual GreenNet Potluck. Community gardeners from across the city took part in a One Seed Chicago primary election which narrowed the race to the three herb candidates. In addtion, this year One Seed Chicago is expanding voting even further, offering schools, offices, garden clubs and wherever gardeners gather the opportunity to host a polling station.

“This being an election year, we thought we’d celebrate our democracy by growing new voters along with seeds,” explains Helphand. “Gardeners who want to host a polling station can download a ballot, poster and Teacher’s activity guides from the One Seed Chicago website.”

Voting
Voting began on Sunday, January 1, 2012 and continues until April 1, 2012. The winning seed will be unveiled at GreenNet’s annual Green and Growing Fair at the Garfield Park Conservatory. To vote simply log onto www.OneSeedChicago.com.

Origins of One Seed Chicago
One Seed Chicago is a project of NeighborSpace, Chicago’s land trust for community gardens. Entering its fourth year One Seed Chicago aims to introduce more Chicagoans to the joys and benefits of gardening. Previous winners: Sunflower 2008. Blue Lake Pole bean 2009. Beebalm 2010. Swiss chard 2011. Since 2008 One Seed Chicago has distributed over one million seeds to Chicago residents.

About NeighborSpace
NeighborSpace is a nonprofit urban land trust dedicated to preserving and sustaining community managed open spaces in Chicago. Their growing network of gardens provide thousands of people the opportunity to grow fruits, vegetables and flowers; to restore habitats; and create unique gathering places in their own neighborhoods. NeighborSpace’s partners in the community can rest assured that the land will remain dedicated to conservation and their efforts will never be displaced. For more information, please visit www.neighbor-space.org.

Seed Starting for the Spring

Sunflower Seeds awaiting harvest

Sunflower Seeds

New 2012 seed catalogs have started to show up in the mail. Still makes me feel like a kid to peruse them while dreaming about what gourmet treats we’ll be cooking up with all that we harvest.

Now that the winter break is over it is time to think about what we’ll be planting in the spring and then to start those seedlings indoors.

Warm-season crops include those from the Cucurbiticeae Family (cucumbers, chayote, melons, pumpkin, squash, watermelons) and Solanaceae Family (eggplants, tomatoes, peppers).

Vegetables with larger seeds like beans and corn that we also plant in the spring are better off sowed directly in the soil after the last frost.

For an introductory handout see Starting from Seed.

For more extensive information See Plant Propagation from Seed from the Virginia Cooperative Extension.

Three seed companies I recommend:

Botanical Interests – Large selection of organic varieties.

Pinetree Garden Seeds – Smaller packets, smaller prices.

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds – Large selection of heirloom varieties.

A vast child obesity gap between affluent city, lower-income one

Manhattan Beach has the lowest child obesity rate in L.A. County, Bell Gardens the highest. Their demographics are starkly different, and residents’ perceptions on the issue can contrast sharply.

By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times

Doris Chang limits her three sons’ intake of sweets and doesn’t feed them any processed or frozen food. At their Manhattan Beach home, she monitors the boys’ time in front of the television and keeps them busy with baseball, basketball and karate.

About 20 miles to the northeast, Lorena Hernandez takes her 6-year-old daughter to McDonald’s at least twice a week and frequently gives her Kool-Aid and soda. They go to the park often, but when they are in their Bell Gardens home, the television is usually on.

The families’ divergent attitudes toward food and exercise reflect just part of the challenge facing officials as they try to close a vast and costly gap in obesity rates across the region.

Just 4% of children in affluent, mostly white Manhattan Beach are considered obese, the lowest rate countywide, according to public health officials. In poor, predominantly Latino Bell Gardens, the rate is 36% — higher than in any other city.

Click link above to read entire article.

Unromantic Truth: Gardens are hard work

By Tricia Elisara, KidsInGardens.com

Often, the clear-eyed observation that “gardens are hard work” is an argument given for NOT starting a garden.  I believe, however, that this truth is one of the most compelling reasons to (ahem) dig in if you hope to teach character education.

In the spring of 2010, Julian Elementary won a National Schools of Character award from the Character Education Partnership.  As such, a team of staff, teachers, and one parent (moi) attended their national conference last year to accept the award.  Funding had been made available to produce a 10-minute film highlighting how character education is taught at the winning schools.  We hired First and Main Media, and they produced a gem of a video, which is now featured on the CEP’s website.

After attending the conference last year, I noticed that the idea of school gardens as vehicles for character education was absent from the three-day series of workshops.  As such, I returned to the conference this year with colleagues to lead a session entitled “Gardens that Grow Character.”

The intersection of gardens and character education is a theme I plan to explore periodically on this blog, and I thought I’d lay down some history, starting with this film. If you’re in a hurry, the garden makes an appearance at minute 6:20.

Master Gardener Volunteer Training Program 2012

Please read thoroughly. Applications are now available online only through Yvonne Savio. You must be on one of her email lists to receive application link.

MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER TRAINING PROGRAM

13 Saturdays, March 3 – May 26, 2012, 9am-4pm

January 6: Last Day to Get Onto Elist to Receive Application Link
January 15: Last Day to Submit Completed Online Application

WHO CAN APPLY
• Any resident of Los Angeles County with an email address and computer access. Most communication will be by email and websites.
• Anyone who wants to help teach low-income and limited-resource people how to grow more nutritious vegetables and fruits.
• We especially invite residents of inner-city neighborhoods and bilingual gardeners.

HOW TO APPLY
• You must be on either or both of our resource elists – 1) Community Gardening and Food Security, 2) School Gardening.
• If you’re not on either elist, email ydsavio@ucdavis.edu by January 6, 2012 and indicate which elist you want to be on (you can be on both).
• If you’re already on either or both elists, email ydsavio@ucdavis.edu by January 6, 2012 to receive the online application link.
• Complete and submit the online application by January 15, 2012. No application will be considered before then.

WHAT WE’LL DO
• Accept 50 applicants. Main criteria for acceptance: 1) prior community service, 2) know gardening basics, 3) passion for helping low-income
gardeners, 4) given presentations, 5) work well with people of diverse backgrounds, and 6) initiative in starting and carrying through projects.
• On February 1, 2012, we will email you whether or not you have been accepted into the program. Don’t contact us earlier.
• If you have been accepted, we will email you a Live Scan form and list of Live Scan locations in L.A. County for required fingerprinting and criminal background check by the U.S. Department of Justice. This must be done for us specifically, only at these locations, regardless if you’ve done it for another agency. Note differences in prices, hours, and whether an appointment is required.
• If you have been accepted, we will email you instructions on joining our MGs-only Yahoogroup. You can use either your existing email address or your new Yahoo email address to receive all of our MG emails and materials. You will receive LOTS of emails!
• On February 15, 2012, we will post onto the MG-only Yahoogroup your first assignments due on March 3, the first day of class.
• Teach you how to garden successfully. Topics and garden activities will cover basic plant science, propagation, fertilization, irrigation, soil, compost,
vegetable and herb and fruit gardening, flowering plants and trees, Integrated Pest Management (diseases, weeds, insects, small animals), tools, how to start community and school gardens, and outreach techniques.
• Provide you with Volunteer and Continuing Education opportunities all over Los Angeles County.

WHAT YOU’LL DO IF ACCEPTED INTO THE MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER TRAINING PROGRAM
• By February 14, 2012, mail the Live Scan form completed by the Live Scan operator to: Valerie Borel, U.C. Cooperative Extension, 4800 E. Cesar E. Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90022.
• By February 14, 2012, pay course fee online with credit card, or mail check for $200 made payable to “UC REGENTS” to: Valerie Borel at above address. Low-income residents pay only what they can afford—see application for details.
• By February 14, 2012, join our MGs-only Yahoogroup and make sure you’re receiving postings.
• By March 2, 2012, become familiar with our Common Ground public website and our MGs-only Yahoogroup website.
• Attend 13 classes on Saturdays, March 3 through May 26, 2012, from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, at our office. Some meetings will be at other garden sites;
we encourage carpooling with classmates. After the first class on March 3, only one class may be missed – and only with prior notice.
• Give gardening workshops at community gardens, school gardens, seniors’ gardens, housing development & other low-income gardens.
• Answer gardening questions at gardens and fairs, on the phone at our office, or by email from your computer.
• Help with program activities and workshops at the UCCE office in East Los Angeles.
• Post all your Volunteer and Continuing Education hours on our online Statewide MG Volunteer Management System (we provide instructions).
• Starting in June, attend monthly MG Continuing Education meetings on the second Saturday of every month at different garden locations.

WHAT YOU’LL GET
• University of California California Master Gardener Handbook; and discounts on other UC publications.
• Certificate of Completion of Class Instruction—after completing the 13-week training program and passing the take-home, open-book examination.
• Monthly Continuing Education meetings with speakers and activities on in-depth gardening topics.
• Frequent emails of Volunteer and Continuing Education opportunities and other program information.
• Annual recertification as an active MG after you post online at least 50 Volunteer hours AND 15 Continuing Education hours by May 31, 2013. (Future years’ annual requirements are 25 Volunteer and 15 Continuing Education hours.)
• Joy and satisfaction that you’re helping other gardeners grow more nutritious vegetables and fruits, you’re making new friends, and we’re all working together to beautify our neighborhoods and “Green LA”!

For More Information – Email Valerie Borel at vtborel@ucdavis.edu by January 12, 2012

Upcoming School Garden Grant Deadlines

Upcoming school garden grant deadlines are listed below. Don’t delay, apply now.

1) Burpee Home Gardens® is now accepting applications for the 2012 “I Can Grow” Youth Garden Award

The award will sponsor and support youth and community gardens across the US in 2012. What the Youth Garden Award includes: Up to 500 vegetable and herb plants*, $2,500 for program supplies, On-site assistance for initial garden layout and installation, Installation day event publicity coordination, Five gallons of Daniels® Plant Food (a sustainable fertilizer), Flip® video camera to document garden progress,  *Quantity of plants is dependent upon size of garden and need.
Deadline is December 23, 2011.

2) The Captain Planet Foundation (CPF) provides grants to schools, as well as community-based environmental and educational organizations. No grants are made to individuals or businesses.

Grants from the Captain Planet Foundation are intended to:
* serve as a catalyst to getting environmental activities in schools
and communities.
* inspire youth to participate in community service through
environmental stewardship activities.
Deadline is January 15, 2012

3) Whole Kids Foundation will grant 1000 schools $2000 each to build or expand their school garden.
Deadline is December 31, 2011

4) Herb Society of America – Grant for Educators
Each year, the Grant Committee anticipates funding one or two grants for a total of $5,000. The grant recognizes innovative projects that enhance herbal education in school systems, in communities, or in any public forum (electronic or person-to-person). It requires learning goals and a mechanism to measure the educational outcomes.
Deadline is December 31, 2011

5) California Fertilizer Foundation (CFF)
Provide funding to California public and private elementary, middle and high schools to increase the understanding and awareness of agriculture in California’s youth through school gardens. During the 2011-2012 school year, CFF will award 24 grants of $1,200 each to schools in California. At the end of the year, CFF will invite those schools to reapply for a “progress grant” of $1,500 and a free agricultural field trip.
Deadline is January 15, 2012

 

Meet the Beneficials: Natural Enemies of Garden Pests

Ladybug

The University of California Integrated Pest Management Program has produced a very informative poster for identifying good bugs that prey on bad bugs. We call these call good bugs, beneficial insects.

Meet the Beneficials: Natural Enemies of Garden Pests illustrates the various natural predators and parasites that feed on common garden pests.

One example is the lady beetle shown above. They are known to feed on aphids and whiteflies.

So before reaching for harmful pesticides consider biological controls such as  beneficial insects to do the job instead.