School Garden Manuals from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations

Two great (free) publications are currently available from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations aka FAO.org. Publications can be viewed in html or downloaded as a pdf.

Setting Up and Running a School Garden

1. Setting Up and Running a School Garden
Adequate nutrition and education are key to the development of children and their future livelihoods. The reality facing millions of children, however, is that these essentials are far from being met. A country’s future hinges on its youth. Yet children who go to school hungry cannot learn well. They have decreased physical activity, diminished cognitive abilities and reduced resistance to infections. Their school performance is often poor and they may drop out of school early. In the long term, chronic malnutrition decreases individual potential and has adverse affects on productivity, incomes and national development.

Year of publication: 2005
Document Type: Book
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9251054088
Office: Agriculture and Consumer Protection
Division: Nutrition Division
Also Available in: French Spanish

Setting Up and Running a School Garden - Teacher Toolkit

2. Setting Up and Running a School Garden – Teaching ToolKit

School gardens can help to provide healthy school meals and generate income for school funds, but they are primarily a platform for learning – learning how to grow food for a healthy diet, improve the soil, protect the environment, market food for profit, enjoy garden food and, not least, advocate it to others. There is strong evidence that classroom lessons and practical learning in the garden reinforce each other, indeed that often one does not work without the other. New garden projects and programs are therefore making sure that the classroom curriculum finds room for garden-related learning about agriculture, nutrition and the environment. This Teaching Toolkit is FAO’s contribution. It contains lessons which supplement and support gardening activities. These “garden lessons” should have a regular place in the classroom timetable, on top of gardening time. The “garden curriculum” aims to give learners some control over the “food cycle” process, through planning, organizing, promoting, evaluating and – not least – celebrating achievements. The lessons therefore aim not only at knowledge and practical skills but also at awareness, attitudes and life skills. The garden mix of theory, practice, enjoyment and ownership is a winning combination for improving lives.

Year of publication: 2009
Document Type: Book
Pages: 194
Office: Agriculture and Consumer Protection
Division: Nutrition Division
Also Available in: French

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