School Garden News – Murphys, California

Murphys School lets Children Play with Food
by Dana M. Nichols

School gardens are no longer primarily science experiments in which third-graders sprout radish seeds.
Hundreds of school gardens, including the beds of berry vines and onions planted in April at Michelson School in Murphys, also now may change the way students and their parents eat, combat childhood obesity and even give concerned parents leverage in efforts to improve cafeteria food…
The problem is nationwide. According to a Harvard Health Policy Review article published in Fall 2006, children’s intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been falling for 30 years, and only 2 percent of school-age children now meet basic federal recommendations for a healthy diet. The article said part of the problem is that federal farm subsidies go primarily to grain crops, making those crops and the resulting products, such as bread, cheap when compared with fresh fruit and vegetables.
Schools and a variety of public and private agencies in California are fighting back by introducing gardening on a larger scale to many campuses.

For more on gardens, schools, and kids’ nutrition
California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom: http://www.cfaitc.org/
Foothill Collaborative for Sustainability: http://www.foothillsustainability.org/
Life Lab: http://www.lifelab.org/
The Chez Panisse Foundation: http://www.chezpanissefoundation.org/
The Edible Schoolyard: http://www.edibleschoolyard.org/
The California School Garden Network: http://www.csgn.org/

Click title above for complete article.

Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on Reddit

3 Responses to School Garden News – Murphys, California

  1. Susan says:

    Thought you’d be interested in this short omega-3 video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIgNpsbvcVM

  2. Mark says:

    I thought your young gardeners would enjoy an indoor gardening adventure, growing the TickleMe Plant (Mimosa pudica). Recently featured by the National Gardening Associations Kids Store, http://www.kidsgardeningstore.com/14-1030.html
    If you want to give your young gardeners an experience they will never forget, consider having them grow a TickleMe Plant. This is the plant that will close its leaves and lower its branches when you tickle it. They sprout in days and can be grown indoors any time of year. Just Google TickleMe Plants or go to http://www.TickleMePlant.com for seeds and growing kits. This plant has turned many kids into plant and nature lovers. I know, because I grow TickleMe Plants in my classroom.
    Happy Growing,
    Mark

  3. Amanda Planta says:

    The TickleMe plant is now my favorite plant.

Leave a Reply