School Gardens in the News

1) Riverside, CA
Banning children learn how does a garden grow

Third- and fourth-grade students at Hemmerling Elementary School in Banning are tending to a vegetable garden on campus, where they’re growing zucchini, tomatoes, radishes, cilantro and string beans.
“It’s just fun that you get to grow your own plants,” said Nick Barnes, 10.

2) Ontario, Canada
Butterfly project takes wing

After growing from their eggs and munching leaves to grow strong, 20 black and yellow caterpillars each spun a chrysalis and emerged, much to the delight of many Monsignor O’Donoghue pupils, as painted lady butterflies.

3) Sioux City, IA
Students turning park into butterfly garden

Back in October, East Middle School students joined a club called “We Can Change the World Challenge”.  The students met twice a week after school planning to make-over a green space in Sioux City.

4) Wenatchee, WA
School garden brings nourishment to cafeteria and classroom

Anaka Mines held up a clump of grass attached to a maze of long, white roots, and Liberty Bell High School eighth-graders recognized it immediately as a rhizome. An hour later, first- and second-graders from Methow Valley Elementary School needed a little coaxing. “It rhymes with,” Lexi Koch offered, chuckling as she struggled to come up a word, “pie-zomes.”

5) Eugene, OR
How do their gardens grow? With agriculture experts, enthusiastic students and volunteers all in a row

The term “school grounds” used to mean swings, slides and teeter totters. These days, at about 30 schools in the Eugene-Springfield area, it also means lettuce, peas, squash, tomatoes — even garlic.

6) Santa Cruz, CA
Life Lab Science Program Celebrates 30 Years with Garden Festival

For 30 years, Life Lab Science Program has been helping educators and students bring learning to life in the garden. Based in Santa Cruz, Life Lab has been a leader in the garden-based learning movement locally and across the nation.

7) Cardiff, CA
Students sell produce to local restaurant

Children at Cardiff Elementary School have spent the last several months growing produce that will be used this weekend in salads at a nearby restaurant. On Friday morning, a group of roughly 40 students excitedly walked a couple of baskets and buckets full of lettuce, carrots, parsley and edible flowers to the nearby Rimel’s Rotisserie restaurant and got a cool $200 for their work.

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