Tag Archives: swiss chard

Swiss Chard Recipes

Late spring and Swiss chard is still putting out leaves. We have more than we know what to do with. If you have any recipes please share.

I put a notice out to some friends on Facebook and the response was wonderful. Some that I’ve tried include the following:

1. Soup, the easiest by far. Cut a bunch of chard into ribbons, saute in garlic infused olive oil, add vegetable or chicken broth, season with salt and pepper. Serve. To take it a step or two further add any other vegetable you like including rice and potatoes.

2. Tacos. Saute some chard and add a scrambled egg to it. Serve in a corn tortilla with onions, cilantro, and hot sauce.

2. Roll-ups. Think stuffed cabbage but use Swiss chard leaves instead. The key here is to blanch the leaves for 10 seconds in boiling water to soften them, then gingerly transfer to plate drying them off with paper towel.

The picture above is Swiss chard stuffed with Dover Sole, Ricotta, Parmesan and egg. Bellissimo!

 

Harvesting Swiss chard and Kale

Beans are done; corn is done. Squash plants all have powdery mildew and it appears to be spreading to the cucumbers and tomatoes. Welcome to the dog days of summer.

Usually during this time we not only harvest the remains of our summer crop but we also look forward to the fall and the new season of cool-weather crops. I am perusing seed catalogs as we speak.

Two plants that you must consider this fall are Swiss chard and Kale.

swiss chard and kale

Both are highly nutritious and extremely high yielding. You will get more yearly produce from one square foot of swiss chard than you will from any other vegetable. Period.

Lacinato Kale aka Tuscan Cabbage, Cavolo Nero, Dinosaur Kale or Black Tuscan Palm, is an heirloom that can grow to 5-6 ft tall under ideal conditions. Like Swiss chard it is a biennial, which means it goes to seed every two years.

Kale leaves can reach 18” long so giving the plant plenty of room is key.

We planted both of these in the early fall and both are still producing weekly harvests, even through the dog days of summer.

Harvesting Swiss Chard

When harvesting Swiss chard remove the outer leaves and leave the smaller inner leaves intact for future growth. Swiss chard is a biennial which means it goes to seed after two years. Take good care of your crop and you can experience a very lengthy and productive growing season.

Week 20 – Swiss Chard Recipes

Swiss chard is having an identity crisis. Not as popular as carrots or as tasty as tomatoes, this prolific relative of spinach is in need of a good publicist. Being a biennial it will take two years to complete its lifecycle and go to seed. To the school gardener and the home gardener this means greater reward for your labor. With minimal effort one can be picking Swiss chard 52 weeks a year in our mild winter climate. Just pick the outer leaves and leave the smaller inner ones intact.
This lovely rainbow variety does cause heads to turn and students clamor to take a few cuttings home simply because “it looks pretty”, however, the one question I get from everyone, including teachers is, what do you do with it? My simple answer is, its in the same family as spinach, any recipe calling for cooked spinach can be substituted with the green leaves of Swiss chard, the stems are another story and we’ll get to that in a second. Below you will find two recipes for Swiss chard, the first is for the leaves, the second, for the stems.

Pasta with Swiss Chard and Sausage
In boiling salted water cook ½ lb pasta for 10 minutes, drain in colander. In same pot sauté ½ cup onion and 2 cloves garlic in 2 TB olive oil. Add one chopped turkey sausage and cook till browned. Add two bunches chopped Swiss Chard (about 3-4 cups) and sauté till wilted, adding up to ½ cup of broth (chicken or vegetable) as needed, about 10-15 minutes. Add cooked pasta, salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese before serving.

Swiss Chard Stems Moroccan Style
Chop stems from two bunches of Swiss chard (approximately 2-3 cups) and sauté with one onion and two cloves of garlic in 2 TB olive oil. Add a little chicken broth, vegetable broth or water, about ¼ cup, and cook till softened, about 10-15 minutes. Pour off liquid then stir in 3-4 tablespoons of tahini (start with 3 then add more as needed), juice of one lemon, two tablespoons olive oil, pinch of garlic salt, pinch of cumin, salt and pepper to taste.

Enjoy!

Week 12 – Happy Thanksgiving

We are thankful for our harvest of tasty greens and radishes. They will be great additions to our Thanksgiving meal. Anyone who wanted got to take home bagfuls of: lettuce, spinach, arugula, beets greens, swiss chard, mizuna, tatsoi, mustard, pak choi, cilantro and radishes.
Beet Greens

Cilantro

Asian Greens (pak choi, mizuna, mustard, tat soi, and kale)

Spinach

Swiss chard