Category Archives: School Garden News

Support School Gardens – Contact Your Representative

On August 4, 2009, an amendment introduced by Senator Bernie Sanders of
Vermont to provide 2 million dollars to fund a “school community garden
pilot program” was unanimously approved as part of the Senate Ag
Appropriations Bill, which passed the Senate on the same date.

Gardens are powerful educational tools, providing opportunities for children to experience the natural world as they develop strong academic skills and positive attitudes toward fresh fruits and vegetables, and learn important sociological skills that enhance the quality of their lives. Says one teacher from the Arnold Schwarzenegger Charter Elementary School in California, “Children demonstrated a better understanding of concepts and applied them in more sophisticated ways after having instruction in the garden.”

The Sanders amendment funding the program will now go through the conference committee process with the House of Representatives.

I encourage you to contact your representatives in Washington to urge them to keep the funding for the program in the final Agriculture Appropriations bill.

Please click here to send a letter in support of the funding.

As you contact Congress about the bill, I recommend focusing on members of the conference committee, who are listed below. These are the members who will have the most sway over whether the funding is ultimately kept in the bill, and we anticipate that they will make their decision by the end of the September 2009. Thank you again for all of your help!

Sen. Kohl (D-WI)
330 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. Pryor (D-AR)
255 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Farr (D-CA)
1126 Longworth House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Brownback (R-KS)
303 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. Specter (D-PA)
711 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Boyd (D-FL)
1227 Longworth House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Inouye (D-HI)
722 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. Bennett (R-UT)
702 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Bishop (D-GA)
2429 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Cochran (R-MS)
113 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. Bond (R-MO)
274 Russell Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Davis (D-TN)
410 Cannon House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Harkin (D-IA)
731 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. McConnell (R-KY)
361A Russell Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Kaptur (D-OH)
2186 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Feinstein (D-CA)
331 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Sen. Collins (R-ME)
413 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Hinchey (D-NY)
2431 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Durbin (D-IL)
309 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. DeLauro (D-CT)
2413 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Rep. Jackson (D-IL)
2419 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Johnson (D-SD)
136 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Kingston (R-GA)
2368 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Rep. Latham (R-IA)
2217 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Nelson (D-NE)
716 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Obey (D-WI)
2314 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Rep. Emerson (R-MO)
2440 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Sen. Reed (D-RI)
728 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington DC 20510
Rep. Lewis (R-CA)
2112 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington DC 20515
Rep. Alexander (R-LA)
316 Cannon House Office Building
Washington DC 20515

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONACT:
Office of Senator Bernard Sanders
332 Senate Dirksen Office Building
Washington, D.C. 20510
(202) 224-5141

Smart By Nature: Schooling for Sustainability

Smart By Nature: Schooling for Sustainability
By Michael K. Stone/Center for Ecoliteracy
Foreword by Daniel Goleman, author of Ecological Intelligence

sbn-coverSmart by Nature: Schooling for Sustainability portrays the growing sustainability movement in K-12 education, showcasing inspiring stories of public, independent, and charter schools across the country.

This 216-page book describes strategies for greening the campus and the curriculum, conducting environmental audits, rethinking school food, and transforming schools into models of sustainable community.

Smart by Nature is available from Watershed Media/University of California Press in September 2009.

Reserve your copy of Smart by Nature: Schooling for Sustainability from University of California Press.

Local kids learning to garden in school

Students at different LAUSD campuses are having fun learning how to garden.

Click link above for video.

American Heart Associations recommends reduced intake of added sugars

A new American Heart Association scientific statement provides specific guidance on limiting the consumption of added sugars and provides information about the relationship between excess sugar intake and metabolic abnormalities, adverse health conditions and shortfalls in essential nutrients. The statement, published in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, for the first time, provides the association’s recommendations on specific levels and limits on the consumption of added sugars.

Added sugars are sugars and syrups added to foods during processing or preparation and sugars and syrups added at the table. High intake of added sugars, as opposed to naturally occurring sugars, is implicated in the rise in obesity. It’s also associated with increased risks for high blood pressure, high triglyceride levels, other risk factors for heart disease and stroke, and inflammation (a marker for heart disease), according to the statement’s lead author Rachel K. Johnson, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., associate provost and professor of nutrition at the University of Vermont in Burlington.

“Sugar has no nutritional value other than to provide calories,” Johnson said. “Consuming foods and beverages with excessive amounts of added sugars displaces more nutritious foods and beverages for many people.”

The statement says that most women should consume no more than 100 calories (about 25 grams) of added sugars per day. Most men should consume no more than 150 calories (about 37.5 grams) each day. That’s about six teaspoons of added sugar a day for women and nine for men.

In contrast, the statement cites a report from the 2001–04 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) that showed the average intake of added sugars for all Americans was 22.2 teaspoons per day (355 calories).

Soft drinks and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the number one source of added sugars in Americans’ diet, according to the statement. “One 12-ounce can of regular soda contains about 130 calories and eight teaspoons of sugar,” Johnson said.

The American Heart Association recommends a dietary pattern that is rich in fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, high-fiber whole grains, lean meat, poultry and fish.

“This new statement expands on earlier recommendations and gives consumers more detailed guidance by recommending a specific upper limit on added-sugars intake,” Johnson said.

In addition, the statement recommends that no more than half of a person’s daily discretionary calorie allowance should come from added sugars.

Discretionary calories refer to the number of calories “left over” after a person eats the recommended types and amounts of foods to meet nutrient requirements, such as fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy products, high-fiber whole grains, lean meat, poultry and fish. Added sugars, alcoholic beverages and solid fats — including saturated fat and trans fat — are typically considered discretionary calories that are to be included after individual daily nutrient requirements are met.

“It is important to remember that people’s discretionary calorie ‘budgets’ can vary, depending on their activity level and energy needs,” Johnson said. “So, if you can’t live with the recommended limits on your added sugars, you’ll have to move more.”

For example, a moderately active 51–55 year-old woman who eats 1,800 calories per day and maintains her weight would have about 195 discretionary calories per day and only about 100 calories, or half that amount, should come from added sugars. In comparison, if that same woman, still maintaining her weight, was more physically active and burned 2,200 calories a day, she could consume 2,200 calories a day, and would have a larger discretionary ‘budget’ of about 290 calories. About half of that amount, or 145 calories, could come from added sugars.

To ensure proper nutrient intake in the diet and to limit excess calories, Johnson said people should be sure foods high in added sugars are not taking the place of foods with essential nutrients or increasing their total calorie intake.

She recommended that people use their added sugars “allotment” as a vehicle to enhance the flavor of otherwise nutrient-rich foods. For example, choosing a nutrient-rich dairy product, such as a flavored yogurt or a sugar-sweetened whole-grain breakfast cereal, would be a better choice than a nutrient-void candy.

Grants for School and Youth Gardens

The National Gardening Association works with sponsoring companies and organizations to provide in-kind grants to projects that actively engage kids in the garden and improve the quality of life for their communities.

To be eligible for these awards your school or organization must plan to garden with at least 15 kids between the ages of 3 and 18. (Mantis Awards are also open to non-youth organizations.)
Please note that all grant winners are required to complete a year-end impact report (see individual grants for details).

Click on the links below for information on each grant program.
Winning one grant does not disqualify you from winning another within the same year, so please apply to all that are appropriate for your program!

2009 Hooked on Hydroponics Awards
Deadline: September 18, 2009

2009 Healthy Sprouts Awards
Deadline: October 17, 2009

2010 Youth Garden Grants
Deadline: November 2, 2009

2010 Heinz Wholesome Memories Intergenerational Garden Award
Deadline: January 10,2010

2010 Mantis Award
Deadline: March 1, 2010

School Gardens in the News

1) Los Angeles, CA
A new crop of School Gardens

Even as state funding wilts, support for school gardens is growing…

It may seem counterintuitive to start new programs in this economic climate. Summer school was canceled at many campuses this year, the $1.7-million California Instructional School Garden Program grant to the Los Angeles Unified School District has expired, and the budget crisis has left countless teachers unemployed.

But this groundswell, largely sparked by parent and community interest — and perhaps some inspiration from Michelle Obama’s White House garden — is finding support in all the right places.

2) Oregon City, OR
Planting Seeds of Change

Anna Meyrick, the director of Oregon City’s Hera Community School, is always on the lookout for new ways to educate and engage students at the alternative school, which seeks to encourage students to make positive changes through community involvement, education and art-based projects.

3) Brooklyn, NY
Let it Grow

This summer, my daughters and I are getting our hands dirty, thanks to their schools and our city. We may live in an asphalt-dominated landscape, but with minimal effort we have found green spaces where we can practice the good, old-fashioned art of gardening.

4) Brooklyn, NY
New planter stolen from schoolyard garden in Park Slope

Parents at Park Slope’s Public School 107 were shocked last week after a planter, recently purchased for their vegetable garden was stolen from the schoolyard.

“It’s a school, for God’s sake,” said parent and garden coordinator Michele Israel at the Eighth Ave. school.

School Gardens in the News

1) Brooklyn, NY
From School Yards to School Gardens

Students at 10 Brooklyn schools will be toiling in the soil this summer and fall, growing vegetables to feed their classmates as part of an effort to get student-grown foods into the school cafeteria.

“We want to eat the stuff we grow,” said Aidan Israel, 7, a student at Public School 107 on Eighth Ave. in Park Slope, who has been helping cultivate peas, kale and basil in the school’s yard. “It tastes fresher than the stuff in the store.”

2) Tasley, VA
Program introduces children to gardening benefits

Nine years ago, the Eastern Shore Master Gardeners Chapter began, composed of trained volunteers whose purpose is to help educate our community about the art and science of gardening here on the Shore.
Since then eight more classes have received training. Each class develops a unique project designed for public education, such as the historically accurate colonial kitchen garden at Ker Place in Onancock, and the Pungoteague Elementary School gardening project.

3) Fayetville, NC
Homegrown education: School program teaches gardening skills

Jares is one of hundreds of young people participating in the Communities in Schools FirstSchool Gardens program of Moore County. The program began two years ago. Today, there are five schools growing vegetables and fruits with four more gardens planned.

4) New Zealand
Sustenance & sustainability
Sometimes Marfell hits the news for the wrong reasons: chemicals found in a children’s playground that was once a city dump, a school sports field ripped up by vandals, the dodgy connections of some residents.

But it leads the pack in other respects. Last June, Marfell was the first New Plymouth suburb to plant a community garden. A year on, things are flourishing.