10 School Garden Fundraising Ideas

Posted by 18 November, 2014 (0) Comment

Let’s face it, gardens cost money. We need seeds, tools, amendments, irrigation, and if we’re lucky, support staff. How are we supposed to pay for all this?

First, there are many grants that will help you get started. We have published our own list of school garden grants which we update periodically. However grants don’t last very long and after the garden is built there is yearly maintenance to contend with. The answer is fundraising.

The following are fundraising ideas specifically for your school garden. Give them a try. You can raise money and have some fun at the same time.

succulents in containers

1. Plant Sale – For a successful plant sale you can look for donations or you can make your own. Cuttings from existing plants will be the least expensive route. Succulents are great for this. Culinary herbs are also a great idea. My favorite is the Simon & Garfunkel herb garden (parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme). Simply place them all into one container. You can also start from seeds, but just remember to give yourself enough time. Mother’s Day 2015 is May 10th, you will need to start your seeds at least 8 weeks prior.

2. Seedling Sale – Start vegetable plants from seeds to sell to backyard gardeners. Again, you will need to start the seeds approximately 6-8 weeks prior to your sale day.

3. Dried Herb Bouquets – Collect garden herbs such as basil, oregano, sage, rosemary, thyme, mint, dill, etc and arrange into bouquets that you can dry by hanging upside down.

4. Seed Sale – Seed companies such as Botanical Interests, High Mowing Seeds, Fedco Seeds and Urban Farmer Seeds all have seed fundraising programs for you to take advantage of. You’ll make 40-50% of all sales.

5. Flower Sale – You can also now sell flower bulbs through FlowerPowerFundraising.com

6. Compost and Worm Castings – For those with compost and/or worm compost programs selling your finished product would be very beneficial to home gardeners. Compost is one of the best organic amendments available and worm castings is one of the best organic fertilizers.

7. Recipe Cookbook – Collect recipes from students, teachers and parents specifically for all the great produce you grow.

8. Seed Tape – Using strips of newspaper or paper towel and homemade glue (flour and water), we attach seeds to paper and when dry, we roll them up and put a bow on them. We can then plant the seed tape directly in the ground and our seeds will be perfectly spaced. This is particularly useful for small seeds like carrots and lettuce that need to be spaced a certain distance apart.

9. Garden Art – Paint garden signs, markers, decorative bricks, trellises, etc.

10. Farmer’s Market – With the proliferation of Farmer’s Market you now have an outlet for all of the above along with any produce or flowers you already grow. Use the following link from LocalHarvest.org to find a farmer’s market near you.

For more fundraising ideas see Funding School Gardens from CSGN.org

Good Luck!

Categories : Instructional Activities,School Garden News Tags : , ,

School Garden Manuals from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations

Posted by 15 September, 2014 (0) Comment

Two great (free) publications are currently available from the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations aka FAO.org. Publications can be viewed in html or downloaded as a pdf.

Setting Up and Running a School Garden

1. Setting Up and Running a School Garden
Adequate nutrition and education are key to the development of children and their future livelihoods. The reality facing millions of children, however, is that these essentials are far from being met. A country’s future hinges on its youth. Yet children who go to school hungry cannot learn well. They have decreased physical activity, diminished cognitive abilities and reduced resistance to infections. Their school performance is often poor and they may drop out of school early. In the long term, chronic malnutrition decreases individual potential and has adverse affects on productivity, incomes and national development.

Year of publication: 2005
Document Type: Book
Pages: 208
ISBN: 9251054088
Office: Agriculture and Consumer Protection
Division: Nutrition Division
Also Available in: French Spanish

Setting Up and Running a School Garden - Teacher Toolkit

2. Setting Up and Running a School Garden – Teaching ToolKit

School gardens can help to provide healthy school meals and generate income for school funds, but they are primarily a platform for learning – learning how to grow food for a healthy diet, improve the soil, protect the environment, market food for profit, enjoy garden food and, not least, advocate it to others. There is strong evidence that classroom lessons and practical learning in the garden reinforce each other, indeed that often one does not work without the other. New garden projects and programs are therefore making sure that the classroom curriculum finds room for garden-related learning about agriculture, nutrition and the environment. This Teaching Toolkit is FAO’s contribution. It contains lessons which supplement and support gardening activities. These “garden lessons” should have a regular place in the classroom timetable, on top of gardening time. The “garden curriculum” aims to give learners some control over the “food cycle” process, through planning, organizing, promoting, evaluating and – not least – celebrating achievements. The lessons therefore aim not only at knowledge and practical skills but also at awareness, attitudes and life skills. The garden mix of theory, practice, enjoyment and ownership is a winning combination for improving lives.

Year of publication: 2009
Document Type: Book
Pages: 194
Office: Agriculture and Consumer Protection
Division: Nutrition Division
Also Available in: French

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Grow LA Victory Garden Classes at Greystone Mansion

Posted by 8 August, 2014 (0) Comment

Greystone Demonstration Garden

The University of California Cooperative Extension is organizing workshops in various communities throughout Los Angeles County to teach residents how to grow their own vegetables.

I am pleased to announce Greystone Mansion and Park in Beverly Hills will be one of the hosting sites for the upcoming Fall classes and yours truly will be the instructor.

We will be hosting 4 Sunday classes (12 noon – 3 PM) beginning 9/14/14. Those who take all 4 classes will be given a certificate of completion.

Where:
Greystone Mansion & Park
905 Loma Vista Dr, Beverly Hills, CA 90210

List of topics includes:

Week 1 (Sunday Sept 14): planning, tools, seed starting, building raised beds, container gardening, plant selection (what to grow and when to grow it)

Week 2 (Sunday, Sept 21): transplanting, soil structure, soil preparation, organic fertilizers, irrigation, mulching

Week 3 (Sunday Sept 28): composting, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), beneficial insects, organic pesticides

Week 4 (Sunday Oct 5): pollination, seed saving, fruit trees, harvesting, review, and graduation

The cost is $15 for each class or $55.00 for the entire series.

Please make checks payable to: University of California Regents and mail to:

George Pessin
834 Huntley Dr #4
West Hollywood, CA 90069

Space is limited. Please RSVP with payment at your earliest convenience and include your email and phone number. You will be confirmed registration once payment is received.

Contact Info:
Email – gp305@yahoo.com
Tel – 310-779-8816

Greystone Demonstration Garden

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School Garden Report from Upstate New York

Posted by 5 July, 2014 (0) Comment

Group photo in school garden

This spring, with a donation of plants from Cornell Cooperative Extension of Delaware County, and a variety of seeds donated by Page Seed Company of Greene, NY, students planted tomatoes, green peppers, basil, parsley, onions, sweet potatoes, nasturtium, string beans, strawberries, herbs, and perennial flowers.

“I can’t wait to eat the strawberries,” exclaims Asma Butt, who participated in the group since its beginning last year.

The student group Girls on the Run has also contributed to creating and maintaining vibrant gardens on the Sidney Elementary campus. In May, Girls on the Run members worked to clean up the front flower gardens and plant new flowers in areas that were overrun with grass and weeds. The front gardens were further expanded in June with a donation of perennial flowers from the Hill and Valley Garden club of Sidney.

school garden students saving bean seeds

The food-to-school movement, which seeks to bring more locally grown, fresh food into schools, is gaining popularity with students nationwide. Not only does it address a need for healthier food and eating habits, but it can also connect those needs with an exposure to science education at its most fundamental level.

With a growing interest in growing their own food and working with plants, Green Thumb members are already looking toward next year. Mackenzie Dutton, a 3rd grader and avid gardener, wants to expand the gardening opportunities at the elementary school. “I’d like to do more field trips, more nature walks, and grow more food,” Dutton remarks.

Josh Gray, teacher and garden coordinator, adds, “Our future plans include expanding the gardens, putting in some dwarf fruit trees, berry bushes, creating a Native American food garden, a medicinal garden, and a butterfly garden. We’d also like to increase our cafeteria composting program, work with classroom teachers to integrate nutrition and horticultural education into the school-day, and eventually start providing students with fresh, very local, student-grown food. And then maybe get some chickens…”

More pictures and information about the Green Thumb Growers Guild are available at http://www.sidneycsd.org/GreenThumb.aspx

students in the greenhouse

Categories : School Garden News Tags : , ,

Spring Planting 2014

Posted by 19 March, 2014 (0) Comment

cucumber2

In celebration of spring let’s discuss what we’re growing this year.
Our list includes:

Chayote
Genovese Italian Basil
Edamame Soy Beans
Blue Lake Bush Bean
Black-Seeded Yard Long Pole Bean
Honey Select Corn
Rocky Top Mix Lettuce
Imperial Black Beauty Eggplant
Cayenne Pepper
Jalapeno Pepper
Nardello Sweet Pepper
Aunt Ruby’S German Green Tomato
Kelloggs Breakfast Tomato
Black Vernissage (Cherry) Tomato
Prudens Purple Tomato
Early Red Chief Tomato
Lemon Cucumber (shown above)
Mideast Prolific Cucumber
Mexican Sour Gherkin Cucumber (shown below)
Burgess Buttercup Winter Squash
Golden Scallopini Bush Squash
Golden Bush Zucchini
Cocozelle Bush Zucchini
Green Rocky Ford Melon
Haogen Melon
Crimson Sweet Watermelon
and Peanuts!

mexcian-sour-gherkin

Seed Companies we use:

Baker Creek
Botanical Interests
Peaceful Valley
Pinetree
Renee’s Garden
Seeds of Change

What are you growing this year?

Categories : Instructional Activities Tags : ,